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Acidulated malt

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Extract Potential (P/P/G)
Color 3-6 EBC
Requires Mashing? Yes
Max in Batch 10%
 
Grain in the fields

Acidulated malt, also known as Sauermalz or Sour Malt, is a type of malted barley which contains a small proportion (usually 1-2% by weight) of lactic acid.

Contents

Brewing with acidulated malt

General brewing information

Acidulated malt was traditionally used to adjust mash pH in cities with extremely alkaline water. However, the lactic acid used also contributes its own distinctive flavor to the beer when used in significant amounts. Over about 10% of the mash, it becomes more difficult to work with.

Weyermann Malting produces an acidulated malt designed to adjust the pH level in mash or wort. Weyerman and Brewer's Supply Group recommend using the following formula to calculate the dosage of acidulated malt: use 1% of Acidulated malt to reduce the pH by 0.1. (Example: 3% Acidulated malt reduce the pH in mash by 0.3). However, this is an estimate as the exact effect depends on the special conditions in the mash or wort (buffering capacity) and on the composition of the brew water. Weyermann produces their acidulated malt by using lactic acid, which is generated by natural occurring lactic bacteria on the grain. This allows acidulated malt to be used to produce beer styles with a typical “sourish” character like “Berliner Weisse”. Brewer's Supply Group recommends that to reach the Berliner Weisse “sourish” character, 8% of Acidulated malt is a good rate. Brewer's Supply Group and Weyerman also provide a sample malt bill for "Berliner Weisse" as the following: 40% Weyermann Pilsner Malt; 45% Weyermann Wheat Malt Pale; 7 % Weyermann Carahell®; and 8 % Weyermann Acidulated Malt.

Beer styles

Acidulated malt can be used to add a slight sourness to sour beer styles such as Berliner Weisse or Kentucky Common. It is also common in German Gose.

Commercial malt analyses

This section contains information on commercially available malts, derived from the malting companies' malt analysis sheets.

Maltster's Name

Template:MaltAnalysis